Top 10

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The Ashmolean Museum

The Ashmolean is the University of Oxford’s museum of art and archaeology, founded in 1683. Our world famous collections range from Egyptian mummies to contemporary art, telling human stories across cultures and across time. The Ashmolean’s collections are extraordinarily diverse, representing most of the world’s great civilisations, with objects dating from 8000 BC to the present day. Among many riches we have the world’s greatest collection of Raphael drawings, the most important collection of Egyptian pre-Dynastic sculpture and ceramics outside Cairo, the only great Minoan collection in Britain, outstanding Anglo-Saxon treasures, and the foremost collection of modern Chinese painting in the Western world.

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Port Meadow

Port Meadow is a large meadow of common land, which (according to legend) was bequeathed upon the Freemen of Oxford by Alfred the Great after fending off a wave of the Great Heathen Army. Use of the meadow for pasture remains, to this day, a collective right of the Freemen of Oxford. The meadow acts as a flood plain for the river Thames during the winter and during the Summer produces some spectacular river walks. It was also here, in 1962, that Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) told Alice Liddell the story of Alice in Wonderland for the first time.

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Wadham College

Wadham was founded in 1610 by Nicholas and Dorothy Wadham. Dorothy Wadham did so in accordance to the will of her late husband, Nicholas. Architecturally, the College is splendid, a number of the works done by William Arnold and Sir Christopher Wren (Wren was himself an Alumnus of Wadham). The College is considered to be one of Oxford's most progressive and liberal Colleges and is nicknamed 'The People's Republic of Wadham' amongst students at the University for this reason.

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Magdalen College

Magdalen College was founded in the year 1458 and has given the world the likes of Oscar Wilde, Howard Florey, John Betjeman and even King Edward VIII. The College's Choir is particularly famous due to the May Day Celebrations that occur here every year on the first of May. At 6am on May Day, the choir can be heard singing the Hymnus Eucharisticus. Aside from this, the College houses a deer park and a picturesque footpath by the river known as Addison's Walk. At the end of this pathway is an inscription on a plaque written by C.S. Lewis, who was a Fellow of Magdalen College.

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The University Museum of Natural History

A Museum displaying the University's natural history specimens including some remarkable Paleontological Collections. The museum is also the home to the last seen Dodo bird in existence. Today, all that remains from rot are its beak and its feet. The Museum was also the sight of the 1860s evolution debate between Thomas Henry Huxley and Bishop Samuel Wilberforce, which famously critiqued the publication of Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of Species'.

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The Bear Inn

The Bear is arguably Oxford's oldest pub, dating back to 1242. The actual building in which the Bear resides used to be the site of the Ostler's house so it's antiquity can be argued either way. The pub is also the home to over 4,500 snippets of neck ties, which was collected by former Landlord Alan Course.

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All Souls College

All Souls College is a Fellows only College established in the year 1438. The main Quadrangle was designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor, who was responsible for designing the west end of Westminster Abbey. Notable fellows include T.E. Laurence, Bernard Williams, Lord Pannick and Geoffrey Faber. It is possible for small groups to visit the College in the afternoon between 2pm and 4pm.

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The Weston Library

The Weston Library was originally called the New Bodleian Library and was establish in 1940. It was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. After a large refurbishment, it was reopened in 2015 under the new name. Currently, it houses the Treasury, which is home to some of the rarest books owned by the Oxford University Bodleian Libraries.

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The Radcliffe Camera

The Radcliffe Camera is a building of Oxford University, England, designed by James Gibbs in neo-classical style and built in 1737–49 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. If you would like to visit the Radcliffe Camera, this can be done by booking onto a Bodleian Library Tour

£££££
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Christ Church

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. The college is associated with Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head. The College is a popular tourist attraction due to it being used as a filming location in Harry Potter.

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